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RESEARCH

Networks of Exclusion in High-Tech

My current research is a qualitative case study of a U.S. high-tech organization. High-tech companies in the United States claim corporate cultures of inclusion, but the industry is dominated by young, white men. Efforts to advance women in knowledge-based industries regularly focus on networking, evidenced by the plethora of support programs designed to facilitate women building strategic relationships to overcome “old boys’ clubs.”  This project identifies subtle interactive processes perpetuating intersectional inequalities within high-tech. I also reveal the unintended consequences of corporate networking programs designed to improve organizational diversity and the status of women and minorities.

Women in STEM

As a Virtual Visiting Scholar with the Association of Women in Science's ADVANCE Resource Coordination (ARC) Network, I am conducting a meta-ethnography of the research on gender and STEM faculty networks. This project asks: Can gender differences in faculty networks explain variations in faculty career outcomes, including productivity, retention, and advancement?

Sexual Harassment

The stories of discrimination from high-tech workers have driven me to further explore questions of sexual harassment in the networked society. I have collaborated with Linda Blum (Northeastern University) on an interdisciplinary, archival research project that investigates the history of grassroots feminist activism targeting campus sexual harassment.

Inequality in the New Economy

With Adia Harvey Wingfield (Washington University-St. Louis) and Steven Vallas (Northeastern University), I have co-edited a volume of Research in the Sociology of Work titled "Race, Identity and Work" (forthcoming, December 2018) that explores the ways in which racial exclusion occurs in the new economy. This volume also considers the strategies that minority workers use to combat and change patterns of workplace inequality.

My research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the Office of the Provost at Northeastern University.